About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN2 5
WUSA (CBS) 3
KQED (PBS) 2
CNBC 1
CSPAN 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 13
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
was -- out of business but especially if you look at people like howard hughes. howard hughes was a giant failure during world war ii. he doesn't produce any weapons that were. he produces the wooden recognizance airplane very fast but they aren't really use before the end of the war. sent -- this is the whole point. people like howard hughes were necessary so that we could have people like henry kaiser. it's only because you have the failures that you know what doesn't work. every time something doesn't work you know not to go there and so is because we have this and other countries did not, they insisted you went every time or you'd die, that's going to cause a problem down the line. it's no different in europe. the german miracle of economic production was in fact a faÇade. supported by mass conscription that eliminated unemployment but by 1934 and early 1935, germany's economy was already rolling back to its pre-hitler status. only the imposition of tariffs on eastern europe which had no other trading partners and send the acquisition of that new land and enslaved workers allowed alb
look at people like howard hughes. how'd houston was this giant -- howard hughes was this giant failure in world war ii. he produces these wooden reconnaissance airplanes very fast, but they aren't really in use before the end of the war. misses the whole point. people like howard hughes were necessary so that we could have people like henry kaiser. it's only because you have the failures that you know what doesn't work. every time something doesn't work, you know not to go there. and so it's because we have this and other countries did not, they insisted that you win every time or you die, that's going to cause a problem down the line. it's no different than europe. the german miracle of economic production was, in fact, a facade supported by mass conscription that eliminated unemployment. but by 1934 and early 1935, germany's economy was already rolling back to its pre-hitler status. only the imp position of -- imposition of tariffs and soon the acquisition of vast new lands and slave workers allowed albert spear to sustain nazi production. even then germany faced a fatal and hugely-i
at people like howard hughes. howard hughes views this giant failure during world war ii because he doesn't produce any weapons that work. he produces what reconnaissance airplanes. since the whole point. people like howard hughes were necessary syndicated people like henry kaiser. it's only because you have the failures that you know what doesn't work. every time something doesn't work, we know not to go there. we had this and other countries did not commit insisted she win every time or that's going to cause a problem down the line. it's no different than europe. the german miracle of economic reduction was in fact a faÇade supported by mass conscription but eliminated unemployment, but by 1934 and early 1935, germany's economy was showing back to its pre-hitler status. only imposition of tariffs on eastern europe, which had no other trading partners and the acquisition of vast new land enslaved workers allowed albert s-sierra to sustain production. even then, germany faced a fatal and hugely ironic reality of reverse love in front, in which undesirable people were flooding back into g
when he showed us his collection of vintage warplanes. i get this howard hughes-y feel with the planes, hollywood. do you think about that ever? >> well, i hope i don't end up in a cinema by myself watching ice station zebra over and over again. i think i've got such a diverse set of interests, movies, aviation, technology-- >> howard hughes. >> well, i don't know if howard was involved in sports teams. >> allen's diverse set of interests also led him to invest in over 100 business ventures. most of them were poorly managed or ahead of their time, so they flopped, and he slid from being the third-richest man in the world to 57th. were you just too early, or was it that you really needed a bill gates and didn't have that other person to push it through? >> look, in microsoft days, you had some great ideas and some great execution between me and bill and many other people. you know, in technology, most things fail. most companies fail. but i had some whoppers. >> some of his whoppers, however, produced numerous patents. in a move that angered silicon valley, allen sued several giant comp
and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> and howard hughes for research at the manhattan institute. thank you for joining us. the question of whether and how governments, particularly the federal government direct tax dollars to industries was a discussion last night presidential debate and is becoming an ongoing theme in the campaign. the term on which the finance and industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one on which diana furchtgott-roth of the manhattan to senior fellow and speaker this afternoon focuses and are tightly regulating to disaster, have green jobs policies are damaging america's economy. in fact, she subjects the assumptions and policies which led to such elevated as of now bankrupt seller paid no manufacture as well as the electric car battery manufacturer to a withering analysis, which we at the institute have come to expect from this oxford trained economist who served as chief of staff of the council of economic advisers -- sorry. during the administration of pres
and howard hughes. he met eisenhower and mccarter. >> as i backed up i glanced down at him. he was sitting in the cockpit, flames going all down the airplane. >> reporter: he shot down at least four japanese zeros. >> he turned and looked up at me, and i was looking down at him, and for just a second, we had eye contact. >> reporter: in the korean war, he choppered patients to the surgeon memorialized in mash, the t.v. show. >> the infamous hawkeye. his name was sam gillfan. here's a picture of him. there's his buddy, trapper. >> reporter: so you were there for the atomic testing? >> oh, yeah. >> reporter: to the test in the pacific. >> it seared the board and left that. that's atomic bomb blast. >> reporter: kirkland has painted and collected mementos of the war and his life in the basement of his vienna home and in four nonfiction books. >> yes, it's important. and. >> because i can't do everything. >> reporter: he has just finished his first novel. he calls it a wide place in the road. a greatest generation love story. and the -- >> these guys coming home beat up it goes on and on. >>
kandel a nobel laureate, and a howard hughes medical investigator. >> our subject is pain. hrchl is really one of the great unmet medical needs and enormous problem in society. and the most, in the most general terms, bain is a unpleasant sensation in response to a real or potential threat of body injury, and it has an extremely important defensive damnive role, it is designed to remove the injured part of the body from the source of damage. and usually this is transient in nature, but with some diseases, such as cancer or arthritis, it becomes persistent and becomes not an damnive process but, adaptive process and part of the disease itself and adds to the pain .. as we will hear from laurie klein, chronic pain is a disease in its own right. as these arguments make clear, this is an enormous public health problem. 100 million americans as you pointed out suffer from pain every year, and it is the most common reason people seek medical attention. there are two kinds of chronic pain, inflammatory and neuropathic pain, inflammatory, receptive pain is damage to soft tissue and it sh
right now. >>> he served in two wars and flew with the likes of charles lindberg and howard hughes. coming up we'll introduce you to one of the most vibrant world war ii vets you will ever need. >> back to reality, cold front is on the way. we'll let you know how cold it's going to get behind the front. >> but up next two weeks after superstorm sandy tens of thousands of people still without power are demanding answers. >>> just when new york city commuters started to think things were getting back to normal, two crashes shut down the lincoln tunnel for hours this morning. in one case about 20 people were hurt, at least two of them seriously when a new jersey transit bus slammed into a trailways bus. the crash happened during the morning rush hour on the new jersey side and then two hours later a bus and a truck collided also on the new jersey side. those delays lasted as long as three hours. investigators are trying to figure out what caused the crashes. >>> in indianapolis investigators might have some new clues as to the cause of a deadly home explosion that happened over the we
aircraft when howard hughes was still alive. i had been working there for two months. , walked in to my boss's office the secretary in front of his office, a senior engineer was in there talking to the boss, laying out all these problems and issues. and he felt very proud of himself and sat down and just waited. the department manager, my boss, went right back at him and said, i cannot stand that. it is your job to bring the solutions, not problems. if i have to solve all your problems, i do not need you. just a word of advice as we move into the industry and our next life, your boss is going to be looking for solutions. articulate the problem, but no matter what, try to end on a positive note and articulate the solution also. it does not have to be the perfect one or the right one. many times it will not be. i will and this -- end this with an upbeat way of what we can do about this big threat. if you walk away with anything today other than the lights going out and coming back on, kind of a basic paradigm that could stick with you -- it would be of immense value drug or life. -- throu
't even know how you got my number. until this morning, i looked like howard hughes without the money. >> david feherty, thank you. >> thank you. >>> and 40 years ago a convicted killer took off in a hijacked plane and disappeared. 48 hours have been digging into this case of murder, ran some and radical politics. we'll have a preview ahead on "cbs this morning." digging into this case of murder, ransom, and politics. we'll have a preview ahead on cbs "this morning." >> >> announcer: this portion of cbs this morning sponsored by citi. buy now, save later. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. buy now. save later. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. so i never missed a beat. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. ♪ ♪ th
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)